Thursday, September 14, 2006

When standing out is outstanding

Following my previous gloomy posts, I feel I have to redress the balance somewhat and talk about the positive side of living in a minority Muslim community.

Alhamdulilah, where I live, we are truly blessed with a small, ethnically mixed and thriving community. So-called "extremism" doesn't have a place here. I have yet to hear a Khutbah that I would be embarrassed to have my family or non-Muslim friends listen to.

Whether you are greeting someone in person, over the phone or via text or email, you always say Salaam Alaikum.
Everyone is brother or sister here. I have friends from Muslim majority countries who find that strange. Here it feels natural, we are few, we feel a greater bond to each other.

A major plus point of wearing hijab is that easy identification we can make. You see another muhijabi and you will smile and exchange salaams, even if you don't know them, there is that connection there.

Recently the sisters held a big iftar to raise funds for Lebanon. The venue was packed with sisters of all backgrounds and ethnicities and just about every style of dress and hijab imaginable. We prayed together, made du'a together and then all shared the delicious food each sister had brought. With everyone united for the purpose of pleasing Allah, it was like a tiny glimpse of Jannah.

11 comments:

DA said...

I totally know what you mean. I was at the grocery store late last night (around midnight) and a couple walks by. I'm bad at guessing ethnicities (though pretty much everyone is) so I would never assume that they were Muslims but the woman was wearing hijab. I vantured an "A Salaamu Alykum" and they spoke back with "wa alaykum salaam". Turns out they're a yemeni couple going to my school. Meeting a couple more Muslims in his little town really made my night.

Masha'allah, your community sounds great ukthi. I'm a little jealous!

Oh, and I was planning to hold a few iftars at my house during ramadan seeing as we have no masjid here. Only problems

What if nobody comes?

What if they all come, can I fit like 14 people in my little apartment?

Can I convince Pakistanis, Arabs, Black American Muslims, and Persians to chow down on Soul Food instead of the stuff they're used to?

Hmmm......

Alina said...

I believe this should happen only because we are human beings. Period. However, nice to have a picture of such a beautiful commmunity, even if it's just a minoritary one.

Maxxed`ouT said...

Are you still on good terms with your parents after the conversion ?

Masd said...

MashAllah you people are living in harmony and enjoying the love and warmth in a small community of Muslims. May Allah keep you always in peace.

Bilal said...

tanx for this- i can also relate a bit. but as south africans i believe we find ourselves in a unique situation: we are a minority group but are very much locals to the land...

doshar said...

sounds beautiful.. and sounds like the way Muslims should be like anywhere... whether in muslim majority or minority countries.

Cindi said...

I can so relate to your prev. posts about feeling lonely. It is difficult when you're family's still Christian (or another religion)and you've converted. It's even worse when you get the stares and the comments. Take comfort in the positives which it seems you did and pray for the close-minded people to have open minds. You aren't alone!

Shirazi said...

Very pithy title. Good.

doshar said...

I want to say happy Ramadan in as many muslim blogs as possible...

Happy Ramadan everyone. Hope it brings you all the good in this world and after.

tota said...

Hope u enjoy more gatherings on Iftar this Ramadan mixed with prayers raising the level of closeness to Allah more,. Ramadan always has special different mood, it's a time of worship, contemplation and salvation. Happy Ramadan Safiya.

Hajar said...

Mash Allah, that sounds really sweet.
May Allah protect you all from the envy of those less fortunate!